Thursday, April 10, 2014

Hartselle Graduate Earns Gold Award

Caitlin, a student at Troy University and graduate of Hartselle High School, recently earned the Girl Scout Gold Award. Caitlin earned her Gold Award for her project Strive to Drive? Arrive Alive. She was concerned about the large number of people who have lost their lives due to distracted driving, and she wanted to encourage her peers to change their mindsets so they would be safer drivers. She used the testimonies of those affected by distracted driving to make a video to be shown to driver’s education classes at Hartselle High School. She also created a Facebook page and website to promote the initiative. This project taught Caitlin how to be an advocate for something she believes is important. She now feels more a part of her community, and she has more direction for her future career. 

“I believe that this project was only the beginning of my advocacy. As my video continues to be shown to students, I and the others involved will feel as though we have impacted the lives of each and every person who hears our message, and that maybe we have saved them in a small way,” said Caitlin.

“By earning the Girl Scout Gold Award,” said Melva Tate, interim chief executive officer of the Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama, “Caitlin has become a community leader. Her accomplishments reflect leadership and citizenship skills that set her apart.”

The girl who goes for the Gold embraces challenges, achieves excellence, and works diligently to make the world a better place, in her own unique way. Her leadership, vision, and boundless energy is an inspiration to all Girl Scouts. Each girl earning her Gold Award demonstrates excellence through a leadership project totaling more than 65 hours. Girls who earn their Gold Award are also recognized by the President of the United States, the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Armed Services, state legislatures, colleges and universities for admission and scholarship opportunities, and the American Legion. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

About Girl Scout Gold Award
The Gold Award represents the highest achievement in Girl Scouting; it recognizes girls in grades 9 through 12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through sustainable and measurable Take Action projects. Since 1916, girls have successfully answered the call to go gold, an act that indelibly marks them as accomplished members of their communities and the world. For more information about the Gold Award, visit girlscoutsnca.org/gogold.

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Check It Out! Gardendale Troop 30024 Earns Bronze Award

Girl Scout Troop 30024 members Elizabeth, Khari, Kameron, Preslie, students at Snow Rogers Elementary, Aislyn, fourth grader at Fultondale Elementary, Jordon, fifth grader at William Intermediate, Zoe, fifth grader at Gardendale Elementary, and Mariah, fifth grader at Mt. Olive Elementary, recently earned the Girl Scout Bronze Award for their project Check It Out.

The girls gathered books about Girl Scouts and its founder Juliette Gordon Low and donated them to Snow Rogers Elementary and Fultondale Elementary. Through their project, the girls hope to teach others more about Girl Scouting and show why they like being Girl Scouts.

“I like that I’m not too young to make a difference in other girls’ lives,” said Preslie.

Khari said, “I learned that I can be a hero without powers.”


The Girl Scout Bronze Award is the highest award a Girl Scout Junior (fourth and fifth grades) can earn. This award recognizes that a Girl Scout Junior has gained the leadership and planning skills required to follow through with a project that makes a positive difference in her community.

Thursday, April 3, 2014

Huntsville Girl Scout Goes Gold with Habitat for Bats Project

Savannah, a senior at Virgil Grissom High School, recently earned the Girl Scout Gold Award. Savannah earned her Gold Award for her project Habitat for Bats. She was concerned about the rapid decline of the bat population and its effect on the larger ecosystem, so she built bat houses and educated people to give them a greater appreciation for bats. She held workshops throughout Huntsville and Madison, and she created information on bat houses for future Girl Scout troops so they can build more bat houses and continue to protect the animals. Through her project, Savannah’s leadership skills increased as she organized large groups of people to come together. She hopes there will soon be more bat sightings in the area as a result of the bat house protection.

“When I found out how important the local caves were to many endangered bats, I felt inspired to tell people and teach them,” said Savannah. “This way the world would spread about how important the local ecosystems are.”

“By earning the Girl Scout Gold Award,” said Melva Tate, interim chief executive officer of the Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama, “Savannah has become a community leader. Her accomplishments reflect leadership and citizenship skills that set her apart.”

The girl who goes for the Gold embraces challenges, achieves excellence, and works diligently to make the world a better place, in her own unique way. Her leadership, vision, and boundless energy is an inspiration to all Girl Scouts. Each girl earning her Gold Award demonstrates excellence through a leadership project totaling more than 65 hours. Girls who earn their Gold Award are also recognized by the President of the United States, the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Armed Services, state legislatures, colleges and universities for admission and scholarship opportunities, and the American Legion. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

About Girl Scout Gold Award
The Gold Award represents the highest achievement in Girl Scouting; it recognizes girls in grades 9 through 12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through sustainable and measurable Take Action projects. Since 1916, girls have successfully answered the call to go gold, an act that indelibly marks them as accomplished members of their communities and the world. For more information about the Gold Award, visit girlscoutsnca.org/gogold.

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Girl Scout Earns Gold Award with Asperger's Awareness Project

Julie, a graduate of Bob Jones High School, recently earned the Girl Scout Gold Award. Ashley earned her Gold Award for her project Asperger’s Awareness. Asperger’s is a mild form of Autism, and because people often do not know how to diagnose or treat it, Julie wanted to educate people so the students affected by it will do well in school. She put together a presentation and pamphlets for the groups she spoke to, and she was able to share her personal experiences of watching her brother struggle with Asperger’s. Her presentation helped teachers better understand their students’ behaviors. Julie’s project helped grow her leadership and research skills, which will benefit her when she goes to college and graduate school.

“I was able to help people in my community learn about a worldwide problem,” said Julie.

“By earning the Girl Scout Gold Award,” said Melva Tate, interim chief executive officer of the Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama, “Julie has become a community leader. Her accomplishments reflect leadership and citizenship skills that set her apart.”

The girl who goes for the Gold embraces challenges, achieves excellence, and works diligently to make the world a better place, in her own unique way. Her leadership, vision, and boundless energy is an inspiration to all Girl Scouts. Each girl earning her Gold Award demonstrates excellence through a leadership project totaling more than 65 hours. Girls who earn their Gold Award are also recognized by the President of the United States, the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Armed Services, state legislatures, colleges and universities for admission and scholarship opportunities, and the American Legion. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

About the Girl Scout Gold Award
The Gold Award represents the highest achievement in Girl Scouting; it recognizes girls in grades 9 through 12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through sustainable and measurable Take Action projects. Since 1916, girls have successfully answered the call to go gold, an act that indelibly marks them as accomplished members of their communities and the world. For more information about the Gold Award, visit girlscoutsnca.org/gogold.

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Rogersville Girl Scout Earns Gold Award

Ashley, a freshman at Harding University and resident of Rogersville, recently earned the Girl
Scout Gold Award. Ashley earned her Gold Award for her project School Supplies for Orphans. She wanted to build the self-esteem of the children at the North Alabama Christian Children’s Home by showing them that people love and care for them. Ashley knew wanted to break the cycle of relationship issues and habits children who grow up in children’s homes often experience. She held educational sessions for the residents of the home, and she also incorporated a recycling program into her project so the home could generate funds to provide items like school supplies for the children. Because of this project, Ashley’s observation, public speaking and leadership skills have grown.

“I feel much more empowered to make a difference. Before this project, I would never have thought anyone would listen to a high school student about starting any kind of project. But I was wrong…I now know that kids can make a difference if they the desire to do something,” said Ashley.

“By earning the Girl Scout Gold Award,” said Melva Tate, interim chief executive officer of the Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama, “Ashley has become a community leader. Her accomplishments reflect leadership and citizenship skills that set her apart.”

The girl who goes for the Gold embraces challenges, achieves excellence, and works diligently to make the world a better place, in her own unique way. Her leadership, vision, and boundless energy is an inspiration to all Girl Scouts. Each girl earning her Gold Award demonstrates excellence through a leadership project totaling more than 65 hours. Girls who earn their Gold Award are also recognized by the President of the United States, the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Armed Services, state legislatures, colleges and universities for admission and scholarship opportunities, and the American Legion. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

About the Girl Scout Gold Award
The Gold Award represents the highest achievement in Girl Scouting; it recognizes girls in grades 9 through 12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through sustainable and measurable Take Action projects. Since 1916, girls have successfully answered the call to go gold, an act that indelibly marks them as accomplished members of their communities and the world. For more information about the Gold Award, visit girlscoutsnca.org/gogold.