Tuesday, May 10, 2016

Recognizing Volunteers at the Service Unit Level


Honoring volunteers at the point of service is a great way to recognize their dedication locally, where they are surrounded by peers who see and appreciate their work.  This spring the following volunteers were recognized by their service units for a “job well done!”

Volunteers Recognized at 2016 Annual Council Meeting


One of the highlights of each annual council meeting is recognizing our outstanding volunteers.  Girl Scout adult awards are deeply rooted in our tradition and provide symbolic and public recognition of volunteer service that significantly exceeds expectation, is a unique contribution, or substantially supports the Girl Scout program.  At the 2016 annual meeting twenty-five volunteers, six service units, and six community partners were recognized with national or council awards.

Thursday, March 31, 2016

Local Girl Scouts Donate 7,488 Boxes of Cookies to Military

(L-R) Steve and Dianne Moore of Soldiers' Angels stand in front of a truck with 624 cases of cookies that were packed with the help of Girl Scouts of North-Central staff members Jeremy Gordinier, Amy Thomas, Mamie Littrell, Erin Bentley, Kasani Bell and Elizabeth Tucker. 

Ending the 2016 Girl Scout Cookie Program on a high note, Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama donated 624 cases of Girl Scout Cookies to Soldiers’ Angels, an organization that provides aid and comfort to the men and women of the United States Army, Marines, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, their families and a growing veteran population.

The donations were gathered as a part of the Operation: Cookie Care Package campaign, where consumers could donate boxes of cookies to Soldiers’ Angels from local Girl Scouts. There are 12 boxes of Girl Scout Cookies in each case, so nearly 7,500 boxes of donated cookies purchased by people in North-Central Alabama will be delivered to various military personnel by Soldiers’ Angels.

Steve Moore of Soldiers' Angels packs a truck
with Girl Scout Cookies.
"Every service member who is deployed appreciates a gift from home but there’s nothing like Girl Scout Cookies,” said Karen Peterlin, chief executive officer of the Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama and retired US Army veteran.  

“I can vividly remember cases of Thin Mints that arrived crushed. A soldier who was a former Girl Scout came to the rescue with bowls and ice cream to make Thin Mint sundaes! Talk about some happy soldiers.”

Giving back to the community is a main tenant of the Girl Scout Cookie Program. As a part of the 5 Skills that girls acquire through the program, troops are encouraged to set goals before the program begins. Most troops in North-Central Alabama set a goal to give back to their local community, whether that’s something like donating to their local animal shelter or using proceeds earned through the Program to clean up their local park.

“We are so grateful to each person who donated boxes of Girl Scout Cookies for our military personnel,” Peterlin said. “You’ve made a difference in the lives of those who serve us, as well as the girls who are growing to be tomorrow’s leaders.”

About Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama

We're over 13,000 strong—9,500 girls and 3,800 adults in 36 counties in the state of Alabama who believe girls can change the world. It began over 100 years ago with one woman, Girl Scouts' founder Juliette Gordon "Daisy" Low, who believed in the power of every girl. She organized the first Girl Scout troop on March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Georgia, and every year since, we've made her vision a reality, helping girls discover their strengths, passions, and talents.


Today we continue the Girl Scout mission of building girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. Girl Scouts is the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama is a United Way partner. To volunteer, reconnect, donate or join, visit www.girlscoutsnca.org or call 800-734-4541.

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

World Thinking Day: Cookies, Valentines and an International Sisterhood

February is a busy month for Girl Scouts. Most councils are well into the sale and delivery of cookies. Daisies, Brownies, Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors and Ambassadors are crafting or delivering Valentines. On February 22 we celebrate World Thinking Day with all our sister Girl Guides and Girl Scouts around the world.

Lord Robert Baden-Powell (founder of Boy Scouting) and his wife, Lady Olave Baden-Powell (World Chief Guide) were both born on February 22nd (35 years apart!). In 1926 the 4th International Conference established this date as Thinking Day. We all celebrate our common goals and our diversity throughout the 146 countries of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) on this date.
The Thinking Day symbol was created in 1975. The World Trefoil forms the center and represents the World Association. The arrows pointing toward the trefoil represent action and direction. The design is circular and represents the World of Girl Guide/Girl Scout Movement. The 30th World Conference made February 22nd “World” Thinking Day in 1999.  In recent years each triennium the World Thinking Day logo changes to reflect the current girl trends and the emphasis of our world organization.

Every year we encourage our troops to participate in World Thinking Day in many different ways. Some troops explore Girl Guides/Girl Scouts in other countries learning about the native dress, language and the Promise and the Laws in the native language. They discover, connect, and take action to better understand their world.  Other girls choose to contribute to the Juliette Low World Friendship Fund (JLWFF) at this time. This fund helps to extend Girl Scouting and Girl Guiding to new members in many parts of the world. It supports international friendship through take action projects, training, events and exchange visits for Girl Scouts from member nations of WAGGGS.

The international friendship started with Juliette Low and Agnes Baden-Powell (founder of Guiding, sister to Lord Baden-Powell) lives on today in the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts and is celebrated each February 22nd with World Thinking Day. How ever you choose to remember and celebrate this day, we should all be grateful to belong to a world association whose only mission is to support girls and young women to develop their full potential as leaders and active citizens of the world. 

Barbara Johnson


GSNCA Volunteer

Explore what your troop can do on World Thinking Day.


Monday, January 11, 2016

Girl Scout Starts Successful Trading Library, Earns Gold Award


 BIRMINGHAM, Ala.January 11, 2016–Lillian Sharp, a senior at the Altamont School and native of Birmingham, earned the Girl Scout Gold Award. Sharp earned her Gold Award for her project, “Lilly’s Literacy.” Sharp discovered that many children in her community didn’t have books at home, and this seriously affected their reading skills. Sharp connected with her local library and with S.T.A.I.R. (Start The Adventure In Reading) Birmingham to see how she could take action on the issue. Sharp gave books to over 100 children in the Avondale area, and began a successful trading program, “The Free Little Library,” at Avondale United Methodist Church, that will last for years.

“A large percentage of kids in my area do not have money to go and buy books, and their parents are concerned with library fines, which keeps them from having reading materials in the home, especially in the summer,” Sharp said. “My Free Little Library set up a trading network that will allow kids to trade books and create their own personal libraries.”

Sharp has also earned her Girl Scout Bronze and Silver Awards, and she has served as a volunteer at the Birmingham Zoo, the Ronald McDonald House and the Avondale Public Library.

“Reading, no matter if it’s fiction or non-fiction, opens up a child’s world, it exposes them to new vocabulary, it strengthens their imaginations and, most importantly, reading is the key to learning,” Sharp said.

“By earning the Girl Scout Gold Award,” said Karen Peterlin, chief executive officer of the Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama, “Lilly has become a community leader. Her accomplishments reflect leadership and citizenship skills that set her apart.”

The girl who goes for the Gold embraces challenges, achieves excellence, and works diligently to make the world a better place, in her own unique way. Her leadership, vision, and boundless energy is an inspiration to all Girl Scouts. Each girl earning her Gold Award demonstrates excellence through a leadership project totaling more than 65 hours. Girls who earn their Gold Award are also recognized by the President of the United States, the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Armed Services, state legislatures, colleges and universities for admission and scholarship opportunities, and the American Legion. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

About Girl Scout Gold Award
Since 1916, Girl Scouts have been making meaningful, sustainable change in their communities and around the world. The Girl Scout Gold Award, the highest honor a Girl Scout can earn, acknowledges the power behind each recipient’s dedication to not only empowering and bettering herself, but also to making the world a better place for others. These young women are courageous leaders and visionary change makers. They are our future, and it looks bright! To learn more about the Girl Scout Gold Award, visit girlscoutsnca.org.

About Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama

We're over 13,000 strong—9,500 girls and 3,800 adults in 36 counties in the state of Alabama who believe girls can change the world. It began over 100 years ago with one woman, Girl Scouts' founder Juliette Gordon "Daisy" Low, who believed in the power of every girl. She organized the first Girl Scout troop on March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Georgia, and every year since, we've made her vision a reality, helping girls discover their strengths, passions, and talents.


Today we continue the Girl Scout mission of building girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. Girl Scouts is the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama is a United Way partner. To volunteer, reconnect, donate or join, visit www.girlscoutsnca.org or call 800-734-4541.