Monday, February 27, 2012

Doodle 4 Google

Exciting news! Girl Scouts of the USA has the opportunity to participate in Doodle 4 Google, a contest where students in the United States are invited to use their artistic talents to think big and redesign Google’s homepage logo for millions to see. This year, students are asked to exercise their creative imaginations around the theme, "If I could travel in time, I'd visit…" One lucky student artist will see their artwork appear on the Google homepage and take home some cool prizes—and as a special bonus, the winning artwork will appear on a limited edition of Crayola's iconic 64 box!

The Doodle 4 Google competition is now open to all K-12 students in U.S. schools (including homeschoolers). Parents, teachers, or after school programs may submit doodles on behalf of their child or student as long as they are accompanied by a completed and signed entry form. Completed entry forms must be received by March 23rd and can be found here http://www.google.com/doodle4google/request.html for download or regular mail.

We encourage all Girl Scouts to get creative and apply for Doodle 4 Google right away! There are exciting prizes, including the opportunity to win a $30,000 college scholarship, and much more!

Girl Scouts of the USA is encouraging councils to submit troop videos of girls engaged in Doodle 4 Google. In order to maintain consistency, all videos need to be shot on an iPhone and the video files uploaded to dropbox. Dropbox.com accounts are free up 2gigs. Instructions can be found here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LhIW207wqms. Once done, send us the download link and we’ll take it from there! To submit video, email doodle4google@girlscouts.org.

Remember to keep clips short and the camera as stable as possible. Please don’t forget to have everyone sign release forms, which can be found here https://pearl.girlscouts.org/Resources/PhotographyMaterialsReleaseJuly2010.doc

For daily updates on Girl Scouts in the news, follow the Girl Scout blog. Join in the conversation by following us on Twitter and Facebook as well.

Please contact Joshua Ackley at jackley@girlscouts.org or Lillian Ruiz at lruiz@girlscouts.org with questions.

Thursday, February 23, 2012

Mountain Brook Girl Earns President's Award


Riva, a sophomore at Mountain Brook High School, recently earned a President’s Volunteer Service Award as part of the Prudential Spirit of Community Awards on behalf of President Barack Obama. 

Riva’s Girl Scout experience has given her many opportunities to give back to her community. She has worked at Rocky Mountain Day Camp for several years, worked at Service Unit weekends, volunteered at Girl Scout Word Thinking Day programs, helped with recruitment, and has aided in program delivery in the Girl Scouts’ Hispanic Initiative.

Riva is the daughter of Judy and James of Mountain Brook.

The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program recognizes young people across America for outstanding community service activities.

Monday, February 20, 2012

Over the Mountain Girls Earn Gold Awards


Courtney - Picture This: Cooking Step by Step
Courtney recently earned her Gold Award for her project Picture This: Cooking Step by Step.  With the help of her troop and teachers at Pelham High School, Courtney put together a photo cookbook with step-by-step instructions for students enrolled in the special needs program. As a result of her hard work, Courtney will present her cookbook to state educators at the Alabama Transition Conference in March.

Courtney is from Helena and is currently a freshman at Huntingdon College. 

Emily - Message in a Bottle/Mensaji en una Botella
For Emily's Gold Award project, she worked with Fiesta, Inc. to bring Recycle Alabama to its annual Hispanic Event at Regions Park in Hoover.  Emily made sure bins were available for aluminum and plastic items and handed out reusable water bottles with messages in them about the benefits of recycling. In the Children’s Village, Emily and her volunteers performed skits throughout the day about the importance of recycling at home.

“Recycling plastic and aluminum is a simple and effective way to protect our environment,” Emily said, “People just need to be better educated about how they can participate.”

Emily is a senior at Hoover High School. Her parents are Eddie and Teresa.

Emily - Cornelia de Lange Syndrome Family Gathering
Emily brought over 60 people together for her Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) Family Gathering, a genetic disorder that directly affects her. Emily invited families affected by CdLS to join her for a day of connecting, sharing and learning. She also invited a Family Service Coordinator from the CdLS Foundation, Vanderbilt and University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) medical doctors, and a special education teacher. Families were able to share information and consult with the program’s presenters. In June, Emily will speak at the CdLS National Conference about her experience with the disease and her future plans.

“The project was hard and time-consuming,” said Emily, “but I completed it because I pushed myself and I was determined.”

Emily is a senior at Hoover High School.  Her parents are Walter and Sandra.

Susan - Renovation of the Oak Mountain Middle School Long Jump Pit
Susan, a member of the track and cross country team at Oak Mountain High School, renovated the middle school’s long jump pit for her Gold Award project. The old pit was inadequate and unsafe for practice. With the help of a troop friend and two teammates, Susan removed the grass in the old pit and dug out a trench to hold the new wooden frame.  In addition to rebuilding the pit, Susan spent many afternoons coaching the middle school students in 300- and 400-meter hurdles, and high and long jump techniques. Susan reveals, “The most successful part of my project was seeing the kids that I coached reach their season goals.”

Susan is a senior at Oak Mountain High School.

Tory - Brock's Gap Survival 101
Tory hosted a workshop for incoming sixth grade girls and Brock’s Gap Intermediate School for her Gold Award project. The idea came to her after her younger sister and her friends expressed their concerns about starting middle school. Tory worked with over 60 girls to share advice, take a school tour and practice opening lockers. Tory reveals, “I’m glad I was able to help ease the transition to middle school because it can be a scary thing.”

Tory is a senior at Hoover High School. Her parents are Debbie and Richard.

Caroline - Home Tweet Home
Caroline worked with Turkey Creek Nature Preserve in Pinson to build an on-site bird haven for her Gold Award project. With her dad’s help, Caroline built 12 houses, and her brother’s Boy Scout troop helped hammer the bird houses to the trees. She also gave a bird presentation to a Girl Scout troop and had them help her make pinecone bird feeders and string together Fruit Loops. “My great, great grandfather built a cabin on Turkey Creek that we still use,” said Caroline. “We still have his diaries from over 100 years ago about the wildlife he enjoyed, and I hope that others can now enjoy the wildlife too.”

Caroline is a senior at Vestavia Hills High School. Her parents are Elizabeth and Rich.

Grace - Jag Running Club 
Grace started a running club for students at Greystone Elementary. Grace met with the students two to three times a week to run before school.  Grace said, “I wanted the focus to be on preventing childhood obesity, not speed or ability.” As a result, Grace incorporated healthy eating habits into her program and made the children keep a personal fitness log. “It’s important to make running fun,” Grace reveals, “because if they enjoy it, they will continue to do it.”

Grace is a junior at Spain Park High School. Her parents are Susan Wilkens and Michael.

About the Gold Award
The Gold Award is highest level of Girl Scout achievement. This award recognizes the Senior & Ambassador Girl Scout’s commitment to herself, her community, and her future. The girl who goes for the Gold embraces challenges, achieves excellence, and works diligently to make the world a better place, in her own unique way. Her leadership, vision, and boundless energy is an inspiration to all Girl Scouts. Each girl earning her Gold Award demonstrates excellence through a leadership project totaling more than 65 hours. Girls who earn their Gold Award are also recognized by the President of the United States, the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Armed Services, state legislatures, colleges and universities for admission and scholarship opportunities, and the American Legion.

Friday, February 17, 2012

Registration Opens February 18 for Summer Camps

Resident and Day Camp Open to Non-Members

Summer camp is known for being a place to have fun outdoors, make new friends and create lifelong memories. But what children don’t realize is that summer camp provides so much more. They have five key opportunities at summer camp: encounter new challenges, experience success, develop leadership skills, improve self-esteem and build life skills.

“Children who attend camp have shown improvements in leadership, peer relations and self-esteem,” said Aimee Canterbury, Camp Director for Camp Trico. “Learning involves acquiring behaviors, skills, values and understandings that are not always academic in nature. They participate in activities that offer intentional opportunities to practice decision making and teamwork.”

“Girl Scout camps offer experiences for everyone, regardless if they are Girl Scouts or not,” said Laura Elliott, Camp Coleman Director. “Many camps even offer day camp programs to boys! Day camps are a great alternative to daycare. Registration begins February 18.”

Camp Anderel
Telephone: 256-425-0876 or 800-734-4541 x1238
Address: 631 County Road 635, Rogersville, AL 35652
Email: hsellers@girlscoutsnca.org
Website: www.girlscoutsnca.org/camps
Ages: 5-17. Programs for Girl Scout members
Start and End Dates: July 6 – July 27

Camp Anderel, located where the Elk River and Anderson Creek meet in Rogersville, will host a variety of events including an older girl sleepover and day events where girls can play in the water, learn about water safety and explore nature with the help of Fancy Nancy! To learn more about Camp Anderel’s programs, come to an open house on Saturday, March 17 from 2 to 4 p.m.

Camp Coleman
Telephone: 205-655-3782 or 800-734-4541 x2001
Address: 4010 Camp Coleman Road, Trussville, AL 35173
Email: lelliott@girlscoutsnca.org
Website: www.girlscoutsnca.org/camps
Ages: 5-17. Resident and day camp programs for girls and boys, members and non-members
Start and End Dates: May 29 – August 3
Price Range: $125-$398

Camp Coleman offers equestrian programs as well as special theme camps! Girls can learn how to ride and care for horses or they can spend the week designing clothes and jewelry, or canoeing and zip lining at night, all while enjoying swimming, ropes course and other camp activities. Special sessions include a magical-themed camp where campers attend Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry and a Disney-themed camp. To learn more about Camp Coleman’s summer programs, come to an open house on Sunday, March 25 from 2 to 4 p.m. 


Camp Cottaquilla
Telephone: 256-295-9082 or 800-734-4541 x1104
Address: 2500 Cottaquilla Road, Anniston, AL 36207
Email: bgable@girlscoutsnca.org
Website: www.girlscoutsnca.org/camps
Ages: 6-17. Resident and day camp programs for girls and boys, members and non-members
Start and End Dates: June 4 – June 15
Price Range: $125-$285

Camp Cottaquilla offers some unique resident camp programs. Special sessions include designing clothes and accessories from recycled items; theater sessions where girls will act, write scripts and design costumes; as well as a fairy-themed camp where girls will design their own fairy wings, go on a fairy hike and play fairy games! Of course, there’s always time for traditional camp activities of swimming, canoeing or archery. To learn what Camp Cottaquilla can offer your child, come to an open house on Saturday, April 21 from 2 to 4 p.m.

Kanawahala Program Center (KPC)
Telephone: 205-678-8843 or 800-734-4541 x1600
Address: 831 Girl Scout Road, Chelsea, AL 35043
Email: tknowles@girlscoutsnca.org
Website: www.girlscoutsnca.org/camps
Ages: 5-17. Resident and day camp programs for girls and boys, members and non-members
Start and End Dates: May 29 – July 27
Price Ranges: $125-$388

KPC has a private lake perfect for week-long water sports sessions. KPC offers creative camps where girls practice cake-decorating skills, tie-dying clothes or making jewelry. Special camps include a Mardi Gras week and a rock star week. Girls also have opportunities to run the zip line at night or solve a camp mystery in addition to traditional camp activities. KPC also offers equestrian programs. To learn what KPC can offer your child, come to an open house on Sunday, April 15 from 2 to 4 PM.

Camp Tombigbee
Telephone: 205-372-3292 or 800-734-4541 x1412
Address: 6206 Ala. Hwy. 39, Boligee, AL 35443
Email: cmorrow@girlscoutsnca.org
Website: www.girlscoutsnca.org/camps
Ages: 5-17. Programs for Girl Scout members
Start and End Dates: July 10 – July 21

Located in the heart of Greene County, Camp Tombigbee offers activities for all age groups. Learn archery skills or enjoy beautiful scenery on a hike as you experience nature at its finest! Camp Tombigbee offers summer programs where girls can have a sleepover, have a fitness day or spend the day learning about our earth. To learn more, come to an open house on Sunday, April 29 from 2 to 4 PM.

Camp Trico
Telephone: 256-582-2617 or 800-734-4541 x1701
Address: 315 Trico Drive, Guntersville, AL 35976
Email: acanterbury@girlscoutsnca.org
Website: www.girlscoutsnca.org/camps
Ages: 5-17. Resident and day camp programs for girls and boys, members and non-members
Start and End Dates: May 18 - August 3
Price Range: $150-$372

Camp Trico on Lake Guntersville has nearly a mile of shoreline on the state's largest lake. Water activities like canoeing, tubing behind the pontoon boat, snorkeling and every other water game you can imagine is just the beginning. Horseback riding, archery, digital photography, cake decorating, extreme camping and event planning are just a few programs you’ll find here this summer. Just 1-1/2 hours from Birmingham, Camp Trico is the perfect summer camp for anyone! To learn what Camp Trico can offer your child, come to an open house on Sunday, March 18 from 2 to 4 PM.

Online registration for all camp programs begins February 18 at www.girlscoutsnca.org/camps.

About GSNCA Camps
At all Girl Scout camps, everyone experiences outdoor programs that build courage, confidence and character. Activities can include swimming, archery, boating, canoeing, crafts, games, hiking, horseback riding, archery, rock climbing and ropes courses. Everyone who comes to camp enjoys balanced meals with healthy choices. Five Girl Scout camps are accredited by the American Camp Association. All camps are available for outside groups to rent for family reunions, as well as church, civic or corporate group events.

About Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama
2012 is the Year of the Girl! To get involved, visit our 100th anniversary link at www.girlscoutsnca.org/100. Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama is a United Way community partner and serves 15,300 girls ages 5-17 and 5,000 volunteers across 36 counties. For more information on becoming a member, volunteering or pathway opportunities, call 800-734-4541 or visit www.girlscoutsnca.org.


Tuesday, February 14, 2012

Girl Scouts Release Research Affirming Girls' Interest in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math


Today the Girl Scout Research Institute (GSRI) released a new study affirming girls’ interest in STEM. Generation STEM: What Girls Say about Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math, says that while a majority of today’s girls have a clear interest in STEM, they don’t prioritize STEM fields when thinking about their future careers.

This latest offering from GSRI shows 74 percent of teen girls are interested in STEM subjects. Further, 82 percent of girls see themselves as “smart enough to have a career in STEM.” And yet, few girls consider it their number-one career option: 81 percent of girls interested in STEM are interested in pursuing STEM careers, but only 13 percent say it’s their first choice. Additionally, girls express that they don’t know a lot about STEM careers and the opportunities afforded by these fields, with 60 percent of STEM-interested girls acknowledging that they know more about other careers than they do about STEM careers.

Girls are also aware that gender barriers persist in today’s society: 57 percent of those studied concur that if they were to pursue a STEM career, they would “have to work harder than a man to be taken seriously.”

“The Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama (GSNCA) have a proud history of supporting girls’ interest in science, technology, engineering and math through our robust programs,” said Trish Coghlan, GSNCA CEO.  “This study by the Girl Scout Research Institute affirms how important it is for all of us to support girls at a young age and make learning about STEM fun and engaging.”
Generation STEM notes the creative and hands-on aspects of STEM hold the most appeal. STEM-interested girls take an active, inquisitive approach to engaging in science, technology, engineering and math: a high percentage like to solve problems (85%), build things and put things together (67%), do hands-on science projects (83%), and ask questions about how things work and find ways to answer these questions (80%). Girls enjoy the hands-on aspect of exploration and discovery and recognize the benefits of a challenge: 89 percent of all girls agree that “obstacles make me stronger.”

Girl Scouts’ relationship with AT&T constitutes one such partnership. GSNCA and AT&T have joined together to advance underserved high-school girls in science and engineering. As minority students and women gravitate away from science and engineering toward other professions, and employment in STEM fields is increasing at a faster pace than in non-STEM fields, educational experts say the U.S. must increase proficiency and interest in these areas to compete in the global economy. GSNCA and AT&T are tackling this issue with an IMAGINE grant, designed to spark STEM interest in Birmingham city and Huntsville city high schools.

For the full report, visit www.girlscoutsnca.org/STEMadvocacy.

About Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama
2012 is the Year of the Girl! To get involved, visit our 100th anniversary link at www.girlscoutsnca.org/100. Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama is a United Way community partner and serves 15,300 girls ages 5-17 and 5,000 volunteers across 36 counties. For more information on becoming a member, volunteering or pathway opportunities, call 800-734-4541 or visit www.girlscoutsnca.org.

Friday, February 10, 2012

Thin Mint Brownies

Photo provided by littlebrowniebakers.com.

Ingredients:
  • ½ box of crushed Thin Mints Girl Scout Cookies
  • 1 box of brownie mix
  • 2 eggs (3 for cake-like brownies)
  • ¼ cup of water
  • ½ cup of vegetable oil

Directions:
  1. Crush Thin Mints into medium size pieces.
  2. Mix all ingredients into mixing bowl. Do not use electric mixer. Batter will be stiff.
  3. Spread batter evenly in greased baking pan (13 x 9 x 2 inch).
  4. Bake in center of oven at 350F for 30 to 35 minutes
  5. Remove from oven and allow to cool before cutting.

Serve with a glass of milk.

Yields 6 servings.

*Recipe provided by littlebrowniebakers.com

Savannah Smiles Lemon Blueberry Parfaits


Creative Commons License
Lemon Blueberry Parfaits by Meredith Foster is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Ingredients:
  • One small pkg (3.4 or 3.5 oz) instant lemon pudding and pie filling
  • 1 ½ cups whipped topping, divided
  • 2 cups cold milk 
  • ½ cup fresh blueberries 
  • ¾ pkg (about 21) Savannah Smiles lemon cookies. Leave 8 or 9 whole cookies to decorate desserts with, and crush the remaining 12 cookies into cookie crumbs.

Directions: 
  1. Prepare lemon pudding as directed: With a whisk or an electric mixer, blend together the pudding mix and 2 cups milk, on low speed for about 2 minutes. Let set for 5 minutes.  
  2. In a separate bowl, stir together with a spoon, 1 cup pudding and ½ cup whipped topping.
  3. Using 2 to 4 clear dessert cups, layer the ingredients into each cup as follows:
    • Lemon pudding 
    • Cookie crumbs 
    • Pudding/whipped topping mixture 
    • Blueberries 
    • Lemon pudding 
    • Cookie crumbs 
    • Pudding/whipped topping mixture 
    • Blueberries 
    • Whipped topping 
    • Top with a blueberry and cookie crumbs 
    • Just before serving, insert 2 or 3 whole cookies near the edges
Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Note: Recipe makes 2 to 4 servings, depending on the size of your dessert cups. Clean stemmed glasses, such as wine glasses, make for a great presentation.

*Recipe provided by littlebrowniebakers.com.

Thursday, February 9, 2012

Troop 10028 Earns Bronze Award

Recently Troop 10028 from Academy of Academics and Arts in Huntsville earned their Girl Scout Bronze Awards through several service projects.

Zoƫ decided to clean up the greenhouse at her school to earn their awards. She measured the vegetable beds to determine how much dirt and mulch she would need, and used newspaper to act as a natural weed barrier. Not only did she spruce up the greenhouse grounds, but she also added an observation area for learning opportunities.

Abbie, Hannah, Bronwyn and Olivia planted trees around the school’s greenhouse to earn their awards. The girls also built bird houses and feeders to hang in the trees. The girls say they enjoyed the project because they were able to help the environment and provide a cozy home for the birds.

Kiara, Madison, Bailey and Laura earned their awards for raising breast cancer awareness. At school the girls made a video to share with classmates and passed out breast cancer awareness ribbons. The girls also sent pamphlets donated by the American Cancer Society and letters to female relatives and friends reminding them to schedule a mammogram.

The Girl Scout Bronze Award is the highest award a Girl Scout Junior can earn. This award recognizes that a Girl Scout Junior has gained the leadership and planning skills required to follow through with a project that makes a positive difference in her community.

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

2012 East-Central Women of Distinction Honorees Announced


In celebration of their 100th anniversary, the Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama will combine the east and central regions of its Council for one Women of Distinction Luncheon on Friday, March 9, 2012 from 11:30-1:30 p.m. at the Harbert Center in downtown Birmingham. This luncheon will recognize 12 outstanding women representing Blount, Calhoun, Cherokee, Chilton, Clay, Cleburne, Etowah, Jefferson, Randolph, St. Clair, Shelby, Talladega or Walker counties.

The Women of Distinction program pays tribute to women who have made special contributions to their community through civic, academic or professional involvement.

This year’s Women of Distinction Honorees are:
  • Stephanie H. Alexander of Birmingham, Corporate Affairs & Communications, Honda Manufacturing of Alabama
  • Neeysa Davis Biddle of Birmingham, St. Vincent’s Health System 
  • Mariah Nowlin Chapman of Birmingham, Senior Vice President, BBVA Compass
  • Lisa R. Engel of Birmingham, Civic Leader 
  • Kathryn D. Harbert of Birmingham, Civic Leader
  • Joanne Hightower of Rainbow City, Executive Director, United Way of Etowah County
  • Dr. Dannetta K. Thornton Owens of Birmingham, President & CEO, Kennon Family Investment & Properties
  • Leigh Davis Perry of Birmingham, President, Alabama Power Foundation
  • Carol Savage of Jasper, Director of Community Relations, Walker Area Community Foundation
  • Tina Savas of Birmingham, Author and Entrepreneur

In addition, Susan Bevill Livingston of Birmingham, Attorney and Partner, Balch & Bingham will receive the 2012 Mildred Bell Johnson Lifetime Achievement Award. Julia Harwell Segars of Anniston, Vice President Eastern Division, Alabama Power Company will receive the 2012 Frances E. Couch Lifetime Achievement Award.

Proceeds from the East-Central Women of Distinction Luncheon provide direct support to Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama, which serves more than 15,000 girls in 36 counties. Primary benefactors for the Luncheon include: Alabama Power Foundation, Balch & Bingham LLP, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Alabama, and Energen.

For more information on reservations or sponsorships, please contact Leah Beth Downs at 800-734-4541 x1030 or visit http://girlscoutsnca.org/wodeastcentral. Reservations to the Luncheon are $60 for general admission and $45 for Girl Scout members.

Friday, February 3, 2012

Over the Mountain Girls Earn Girl Scout Gold Awards


Abigail | Encounter Your Faith Retreat
The goal of Abigail’s project was to help the middle school youth at her church parish encounter and increase their Catholic faith. Abigail worked diligently to put together a program she thought the youth would benefit from and that would focus on trust, faith and friendship. She planned many activities including skits, games, reflections and a guest speaker. To keep costs low, Abigail found reasonably priced meals, T-shirts and notebooks for the day’s event. Abigail’s parish lacks youth involvement, and she hopes that as a result of her project that the youth leaders will be able to plan future events that are fun and educational. Abigail reveals, “I learned that the younger youth look up to me, and therefore it is important that I lead by example and be a good Catholic Christian.”

Abigail is a tenth grader at Spain Park High School.

De Ora | Eye Can See
De Ora  chose her project when she realized that children living at the Lovelady Center did not receive comprehensive eye and vision exams. The University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry (UABSO) already provided exams for mothers, but because the exams took place during school hours, the children missed out on the opportunity. De Ora recognized that healthy vision is vital to development and success in school, and took it upon herself to work closely with UABSO and the Lovelady Center to incorporate yearly eye exams into the children’s summer programs. Now at each visit, second and third year optometry students can examine 30 children at a time.

“I learned that leadership requires courage, character and responsibility,” said De Ora, “It requires working with others to accomplish a goal and compromising when needed.”

De Ora is a sophomore at Briarwood Christian School.

 Myrah | Saving Trees, Let’s Recycle
Myrah used her Gold Award project to establish a recycling program at her high school. To spread the word about her project, Myrah published an article in her school’s spring newspaper discussing the benefits of recycling and announcing that bins would be placed in each classroom in the fall semester. She also delivered flyers around her community encouraging people to add curbside recycling to their waste management services. To ensure that her program continues once she graduates, Myrah established an E-Club for school administrators and staff. Since completing her project in September, Myrah continues to share recycling statistics once a month in the school broadcast and e-news to ensure that the program stays at the forefront of student issues. 

Myrah is a sophomore at Oak Mountain High School.

About the Gold Award
The Gold Award is highest level of Girl Scout achievement. This award recognizes the Senior & Ambassador Girl Scout’s commitment to herself, her community, and her future. The girl who goes for the Gold embraces challenges, achieves excellence, and works diligently to make the world a better place, in her own unique way. Her leadership, vision, and boundless energy is an inspiration to all Girl Scouts. Each girl earning her Gold Award demonstrates excellence through a leadership project totaling more than 65 hours. Girls who earn their Gold Award are also recognized by the President of the United States, the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Armed Services, state legislatures, colleges and universities for admission and scholarship opportunities, and the American Legion.

Madison County Girls Earn Girl Scout Gold Award

Jessica | Drop into ROTC
Jessica earned her Girl Scout Gold Award for her project Drop into ROTC. When the Hazel Green Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (NJROTC) relocated to Hazel Green High School, Jessica stepped up to the plate to help improve the organization’s new space and increase recruiting numbers. When it was time for the high school’s orientation, the new room was ready for students and parents to learn more about the NJROTC program. According to Jessica, “Students entering the NJROTC program will have more opportunities for post-secondary education and employment. It will also teach them critical job skills, improve their organizational habits and increase their self-confidence.”

Jessica is a senior at Hazel Green High School in Madison County.
 
Jana | Driving Safety and Awareness
Jana wanted to educate teenagers on driving safety with her Gold Award project. To create awareness, Jana set up a Safe Driving website and Facebook page, created a Safe Driving Trivia quiz and gave a “Safe Driving” presentation to young drivers. Jana also created a video and a pledge for young drivers to sign. Jana says that through her project she was able to improve her public speaking skills.
Jana is a Huntsville native and currently a freshman at Mississippi State University. 

Katie | Needy Infant Care Essentials (NICE)
Katie wanted to help mothers and newborns with her Gold Award project. She worked with the Manna House in Huntsville to create an infant center filled with necessary baby items. Katie painted a mural on one of the walls and added shelving to hold supplies. Katie sent out letters asking schools, churches and other members of the community to donate items such as burp cloths, bottles, clothes and diapers. She received enough donations to fill the shelves and a separate storage room. “The response to my project was awesome,” said Katie, “from the community that donated supplies, to the staff and mothers at the Manna House.”

Katie is a senior at Madison Academy. 

Maura | Promoting Literacy at Home and Abroad
The goal of Maura's project was two-fold. She wanted to raise awareness about the challenges of literacy in developing countries, and she wanted to help facilitate the development of a library in a rural community in south Alabama. For the first part of her project, Maura worked with the Huntsville Public Library to develop a one-hour summer reading presentation. Maura wrote a skit for pre-school to middle school children based on the book Listen to the Wind, the story of Dr. Greg and Three Cups of Tea, and the groups would participate by acting out some of the parts. Since the book is about Dr. Greg’s journey to Pakistan to establish schools, Maura also included a small geography lesson in her presentation.

Maura’s project also included a book drive for Saint Joseph’s drop-in center in Vredenburgh. With the help of some friends, Maura was able to deliver 1,000 books. But she wanted to do more than just deliver the books and give her presentation. Maura and her friends spend two days with the children in Vredenburgh, and at the end of each day the children picked out a book to take home. Maura says the most successful aspect of her project was the book drive, “I exceeded my goal, and I was able to share my love of reading with others in a meaningful way.”

Maura is a senior at Grissom High School. 

Megan | Basic Computer Skills Needed to Succeed in School and Beyond 
For Megan's Gold Award project, she teamed up with Girls, Inc. to present a weekly computer workshop to upcoming fourth and fifth graders. Through several fun projects, the girls learned how to use Microsoft Word and PowerPoint. To encourage the girls to learn and be enthusiastic about the workshops, they played games and were asked trivia questions. Megan also created a binder with her lesson plans and a list of resources for Girls, Inc. to use for future workshops. “I wanted to give the girls the knowledge and basic computer skills they will need to succeed in school and be competitive in the workforce,” says Megan.

Megan is a Huntsville native and currently a freshman at Mississippi State University.

Terita | A Diabetic Affair 
Terita wanted to educate people about diabetes. Terita organized “A Diabetes Affair” seminar and invited guest speakers to share their experiences with the disease. Through her project, Terita was able to provide the participants with information about how to prevent and manage diabetes, the warning signs and symptoms, and the long term effects of the disease. Each attendee participated in a risk factor quiz to better assess their chances of developing the disease and walked away with an informational handout.

Terita is a senior at Sparkman High School.

About the Gold Award
The Gold Award is highest level of Girl Scout achievement. This award recognizes the Senior & Ambassador Girl Scout’s commitment to herself, her community, and her future. The girl who goes for the Gold embraces challenges, achieves excellence, and works diligently to make the world a better place, in her own unique way. Her leadership, vision, and boundless energy is an inspiration to all Girl Scouts. Each girl earning her Gold Award demonstrates excellence through a leadership project totaling more than 65 hours. Girls who earn their Gold Award are also recognized by the President of the United States, the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Armed Services, state legislatures, colleges and universities for admission and scholarship opportunities, and the American Legion.